On the eve of what many are hoping will bring a dark horse Emmy nomination for series star Tatiana Maslany, the creators of BBC America’s cult favorite “Orphan Black” are teasing plans for season two.

“There’s not a lot of time wasted in terms of where the season begins. Kira is gone and Sarah is panicking, and the season begins maybe two hours after the end of season 1, and launches like a rocket right from there,” explains creator John Fawcett in an interview with Entertainment Weekly.

Co-creator Graeme Manson adds, “We definitely will be continuing looking at bonds and themes of motherhood in all its guises that we show — Mrs. S. and the foster motherhood, Sarah and Kira — as well as testing and stretching the bond between our three main women Cosima, Sarah and Allison… Sarah’s going to be on the run in season 2.”

The second season does not broadcast until next spring, but with a diehard fanbase that seems to be growing by the second, “Orphan Black” remains a major focus of conversation among TV journalists and social networkers.

As that conversation persists, so too does demand for answers to burning season one questions, including those concerning Kira’s healing ability and Cosmia’s illness.

“These are obviously questions that everybody is going to want answers to. We’re going to get answers — I’m not sure how quickly we’re going to get answers,” admits Fawcett.

Shortly after learning the feral clone was her twin sister, central clone Sarah was forced to gun down Helena in the action-packed season finale.  Though Helena’s fate did not seem ambiguous, many wonder whether the show truly intends to keep such a pivotal character dead.

“I don’t know, I think she was pretty dead. She looked pretty dead to me,” notes Fawcett.  Manson, however, coyly notes, “Shot in the heart, but, you know, she’s kind of a bad penny. Who knows?”

To the surprise of no one, Fawcett and Manson both confirm that viewers will meet more clones as the series progresses, although they also stress that an imminent priority is providing more background on mysterious “proclone” Rachel, who was introduced to viewers in the final portion of the first season.

Fueled by Maslany’s performance as clones with completely diverse personalities, gestures, accents and looks, “Orphan Black” caught fire with television diehards during–and after–its inaugural season.  Its second season is as anticipated as a follow-up could possibly be on a network like BBC America.

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