Two weeks ago, "Girl in a Country Song" debuted at #58 on the Country Airplay chart. Care to guess where "Girl in Your Truck Song" debuted?

When it comes to their commentaries on “bro country,” Maggie Rose’s “Girl in Your Truck Song” and Maddie and Tae’s “Girl in a Country Song” are polar opposites.

When judged by their early performances at radio, the two songs are startlingly similar.

In an update dated July 7, which was two weeks before “Girl in a Country Song” officially impacted radio, Billboard revealed that the Maddie and Tae track had debuted at #58 on its Country Airplay chart.

In an update dated July 21, which is two weeks before “Girl in Your Truck Song” formally goes for radio adds, Billboard confirms that Maggie Rose’s song also debuts at #58 on its Country Airplay chart.

“Girl in Your Truck Song,” which officially impacts radio on August 4, ranks as the weekly chart’s fourth best debut. Jerrod Niemann’s “Buzz Back Girl” (#50), Chase Bryant’s “Take it On Back” (#51) and Craig Morgan’s “We’ll Come Back Around” (#56) also got their starts this week.

Rose’s song now faces the challenge of making the same playlist impact as Maddie and Tae’s “Girl in a Country Song.” This week’s most-added track with 32 monitored pickups, “Girl in a Country Song” is now on 49 stations monitored by Mediabase and an additional two exclusively included in Billboard’s panel.

“Girl in Your Truck” song, which has already arrived at a handful of stations, will seek to make a strong impact of its own in the next few weeks.

Penned by Caitlyn Smith, Gordie Sampson and Troy Verges, “Girl in Your Truck Song” expresses singer Maggie Rose’s desire to be the girl over whom “bro country” singers like Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean and Blake Shelton pine in their blockbuster country hits.

It represents a direct contrast to Maddie and Tae’s “Girl in a Country Song” (which they co-wrote with Aaron Scherz). That song, which also makes direct allusions to lyrics from popular country songs, criticizes “bro country” for its cliched, exploitative portrayal of women.

Due to their intriguing commentaries, the two songs have garnered significant buzz and media attention during a time when powerhouses like Florida Georgia Line, Luke Bryan, Jason Aldean and Garth Brooks are all pushing new music.

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