Insofar as “Suits” is built squarely on the relationship between lead male characters Harvey Specter and Mike Ross, it seemed unfathomable that the USA Network drama would deliver on its tease of landing Ross a new job at an investment banking firm.

And in the closing moments of the penultimate season three episode (which aired 4/3), Ross predictably opted to decline the offer and remain a lawyer at Pearson Specter.

But while it seemed the issue was put to bed, it re-emerged at the end of this Thursday’s season finale. After a tense situation reminded him of the risks associated with his fraudulent stint as a lawyer, Ross informed his mentor and friend that he would, in fact, exit the firm for the new job in finance.

The decision would not, however, spell the end of the relationship between Harvey and Mike. As Mike reminded Harvey–and viewers–Pearson Specter would serve as outside counsel for Mike’s new firm. That means the mentor and protege would remain connected, albeit with a shift in their relationship dynamic. Harvey would now be working for Mike.

By creating a framework in which Ross and the attorneys and Pearson Specter can remain in the same universe, “Suits” enables itself to sustain the episode’s closing twist. There is no urgent need to bring Ross back into the Pearson Specter umbrella.

Indeed, Ross will not simply be back at the law firm when the fourth season narrative begins.

“I wanted him to take it and not undo it in short order,” said “Suits” creator Aaron Korsh in an interview with Entertainment Weekly. “We’re not finished [writing] season 4, but we’re into season 4, and he’s still gone.

“The thing that the writers came up with that I thought was really excellent was that he’s leaving, but he’s still a client of the firm. It was a way to let him leave the firm but still be in our world. That was the key. You don’t want Mike leaving the show, and you don’t want Mike being on an island somewhere else. We felt like that would bifurcate the show in not the greatest of ways. “

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